Fiona Woods, Skin, Call me What you Want

Fiona Woods

Skin, Call me What you Want

2001.

Negative photographic print on Polaroid.

29 x 37.4cm

Purchased from the Nurture exhibition at The Basement Gallery, 2001.

Fiona Woods studied at Dublin Institute of Technology, and received her MA from The National College of Art and Design. She makes work for galleries and for the public realm, individually and with others. Her practice includes curating and teaching.

 

Read more about this artist here:

 “Through my theoretical, practical and curatorial research I am always attempting to answer a basic question for myself; how can change occur and what role can art play in bringing it about?”

Fiona began to practice professionally as a Visual Artist when she became involved in setting up a group studio seven years after she left college. She found the peer support and exchange of ideas offered by the group dynamic useful and it helped her begin her career in earnest. Fiona’s practice is not based in Dublin, and she has found that “choosing to practice away from Dublin has meant that my career has been much slower to progress that it might have been otherwise. However, the upside of that is that I have become involved in an international network of artists addressing rural contexts through their practice.”

Fiona’s work is held in the collection of Dundalk Town Council. It is a negative photographic print on Polaroid, and one image from a series that were grouped together, and that were presented as abstractions of the body.

“It’s really quite a small, intimate image, and it is framed so that it appears as a kind of island in a sea of off-white. It feels a bit lost without the rest of the series. I am not sure how well-suited it is to being presented all by itself”

The work was made for the first body of work that she presented as a solo artist in a gallery exhibition and it defines it as a very important point when she was defining her voice as an artist. The body of work was based on an exploration of the complexity of mother/daughter relations, and she looked at the complexities of that interchange both as a mother and as a daughter, and in tandem with that, exploring the image of ‘woman’ that is normally represented in society.

Fiona makes objects and images, and writes and curates as part of her practice. For quite a number of years she has been working in the field of public art, and has just completed a solo body of work for gallery exhibition, animal OPERA, which is travelling between venues. www.fionawoodsartist.wix.com/animalopera

Find out more about Fiona’s work here: www.fionawoods.net

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